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Praising the Land Purchase Act: Limerick Rally | Limerick Gazette Archives

Praising the Land Purchase Act: Limerick Rally

Limerick, Sunday—A highly attended open-air demonstration took place in the Market Field today, where Mr John Redmond, MP.., and Mr William O’Brien, MP.., were the main speakers. Given the recent differences of opinion between the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party and the member for Cork, this meeting held special significance and garnered significant attention. Mr Redmond and Mr O’Brien arrived in Limerick the previous night, and though their reception was informal, their presence generated enthusiasm.

Mr Redmond received several addresses in the morning and responded briefly to each. The West Limerick Executive of the United Irish League expressed confidence in Mr Redmond and the Irish Party, emphasizing the need for various measures to improve governance in Ireland. The County Limerick Evicted Tenants’ Association hailed Mr Redmond’s arrival, accompanied by Mr O’Brien, as a positive sign, removing the previous sense of sadness. The Ennis Urban District Council praised Mr Redmond’s work in passing the Land Act and acknowledged the sterling qualities of Mr O’Brien, the founder of the United Irish League.

During his speech, Mr Redmond stressed the importance of goodwill and conciliation. He clarified that conciliation did not imply that all concessions should come from one side; rather, it required meeting aggression and rapacity from landlords with organized and determined resistance. Mr Redmond recognized the differences in individual rights and views on the Land Act but emphasized the united advice given to the people through the League and other authoritative sources. He highlighted the challenges faced in implementing the Act but attributed any shortcomings to administrative difficulties and the resurgence of an unreasonable spirit among certain landlords. Mr Redmond expressed confidence in the future if the party and its organization remained united and if the people followed the advice given.

Regarding the powers of the Commissioners, Mr Redmond emphasized that they should utilize their authority to reinstate evicted tenants, break up grasslands, and fulfill the intentions of the Land Act as a significant measure of appeasement. He believed that irreconcilable landlords would find themselves cornered and compelled to sell on moderate terms. However, Mr Redmond emphasized that the unity of the people and their organizations was crucial for these outcomes.

Touching on the question of Home Rule, Mr Redmond stated that, despite any reservations, he and Mr O’Brien remained cordially united on the main lines of national policy and conciliation. He urged the people to trust their judgment and emphasized the need for calm arguments, mutual concessions, and respect among all Irishmen. He dismissed the idea of splits and foul language, emphasizing the capacity for self-government and the progress made towards Home Rule.

Mr O’Brien, who received a warm reception, expressed his satisfaction with the renewed spirit and unity among the people. He acknowledged that differences might arise but urged the people not to dismiss any conversions among their opponents. Mr O’Brien spoke optimistically about the prospects of the Irish cause and the need to focus on the immediate problems and challenges. He highlighted the progress made in the Land Act and the prospects for Home Rule, emphasizing the importance of confidence and a positive outlook.

In conclusion, the rally ended with a procession from the Town Hall to the Markets, where the public meeting took place. The speeches, resolutions, and addresses from various associations showcased the support and confidence in Mr Redmond and Mr O’Brien. The event marked a significant moment in Irish politics, demonstrating unity and determination in the pursuit of better governance and land reform.

Praising the Land Purchase Act

Limerick, Sunday. Today, a highly attended open-air demonstration took place in the Market Field, with Mr John Redmond, MP.., and Mr William O’Brien, MP.., as the main speakers. Given the recent differences of opinion between the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party and the Cork representative, this meeting held special significance and garnered significant attention. Mr Redmond and Mr O’Brien arrived in Limerick the previous night, but there was no formal reception upon their arrival in the city. This morning, Mr Redmond received several addresses, to which he briefly responded.

The West Limerick Executive of the United Irish League expressed confidence in Mr Redmond and the Irish Party in their address, acknowledging the need for various measures to improve the governance of Ireland. They hoped that no differences between devoted Irishmen, who have fought for the country, would hinder their expectations. The County Limerick Evicted Tenants’ Association warmly welcomed Mr Redmond and Mr O’Brien, stating that their presence lifted the spirit of sadness that had prevailed during their previous visit. The Ennis Urban District Council praised Mr Redmond’s work in the passing of the Land Act and extolled Mr O’Brien as the esteemed founder of the United Irish League.

Advice to the People

Mr Redmond emphasized the importance of goodwill and conciliation. He clarified that a policy of conciliation did not mean that all conciliation should come from the people alone. It would be absurd and unjust to suggest such a notion. People were advised to respond to conciliation with conciliation but also to meet landlord aggression and rapacity with organized and determined resistance. Whenever friction arose, the danger did not lie with the people but often with their opponents. Mr Redmond stressed that the people had received consistent advice through the League and other authoritative channels on how to address the land question. If the Land Act was not working well, it was not the fault of the people but rather the difficulties and shortcomings in its administration, as well as the resurgence of an unreasonable and irreconcilable spirit among some landlords. Mr Redmond expressed his confidence in the future if the party remained united and the people followed the advice they had received.

Powers of the Commissioners

Mr Redmond believed that the administrators of the Act would be compelled to use their extensive powers to reinstate evicted tenants, break up grasslands, and implement the intentions of Parliament for the Act to be a significant measure of appeasement. Unyielding landlords would find themselves driven to the brink and would eventually agree to sell on moderate terms. However, the realization of these goals depended on the continued unity of the people and their organizations. Mr Redmond expressed his belief that with the unity displayed by the people in the face of great provocation over the past twelve months and with the return of Mr O’Brien to public life, the land question would soon be resolved in the majority of the country.

Question of Home Rule

Mr Redmond was glad to infer, from the statesmanlike and broad-minded speeches they had just heard, that he and Mr Redmond remained cordially united on the main lines of national policy and the policy of conciliation. He encouraged trust in the people and their judgment, as he believed they would make wise and patriotic choices despite any differences of opinion that might arise between them and some of their friends who had openly opposed the policy endorsed by the National Directory. Mr Redmond stated that it would not be his fault if these difficulties were not resolved without discrediting the cause. He emphasized the need for calm argument, mutual concession, and respect among all Irishmen in order to dispel the notion that Irish differences could only be resolved through splits and the use of foul language. The days of splits were numbered, just as the days of landlordism were numbered, and the time had come for Irishmen to engage in calm and respectful discussions to demonstrate their capacity for self-government.

Kerry News – Wednesday 09 November 1904