Web Analytics
LIMERICK RESIDENT FACES BREACH OF PROMISE CASE |

LIMERICK RESIDENT FACES BREACH OF PROMISE CASE

In the King’s Bench Division No. 1 (Civil Side), a case unfolded yesterday with a focus on Limerick, Ireland, before Mr Justice Boyd. In the matter of Murray vs. Culhane, Mr Patrick Kelly, representing Miss Mary Murray, a hospital nurse from Rathkinlin, county Limerick, sought an order from the court. The application, instructed by Mr P. T. Lister, aimed either to deem the already conducted service in the action sufficient or, alternatively, to direct other substitution.

The case revolves around a breach of promise of marriage allegation against Mr Oman Culhane, a farmer residing at Ballinbride, county Limerick, where he manages a sizable farm spanning about 140 acres.

According to the affidavits presented in court, the Civil Bill Officer attempted to serve the defendant with the writ of summons at his residence on the 12th and 13th of January last year. On both occasions, it was relayed that Mr Culhane was not present. Subsequently, on the 28th of February, another attempt was made, and this time a copy of the writ was handed to the defendant’s sister, who resides with him.

Adding a layer of complexity to the situation, it was revealed that on the 5th of January, the defendant purportedly assigned his farm to his brother, Patrick Culhane, accompanied by an annuity of £50 for life. The affidavits provided no information on the current residence of Mr Oman Culhane.

In response to the unique circumstances of the case, Mr Justice Boyd directed the substitution by serving the writ on the defendant’s brother, Patrick Culhane. Furthermore, the court ordered that a copy of the writ be affixed to the defendant’s residence at Ballinbride.

The breach of promise of marriage case, brought by Miss Mary Murray, raises intriguing questions about the whereabouts and intentions of Mr Oman Culhane. As the legal proceedings unfold, the court will be tasked with Unraveling the intricacies of this case against the backdrop of Limerick’s rural landscape.

The court’s decision to substitute the service to the defendant’s brother reflects the pragmatic approach taken by Mr Justice Boyd to ensure that legal processes are duly served. The case, with its elements of rural life, land assignments, and familial connections, paints a vivid picture of the legal complexities that can arise in the serene yet intricate setting of county Limerick.

As the legal drama unfolds, residents of Limerick find themselves drawn into the narrative, watching a breach of promise case that intertwines the personal and the legal against the backdrop of their community. The neutral tone of the court proceedings underscores the impartiality of the justice system as it navigates the peculiarities of this Limerick-entered legal saga.

Freeman’s Journal – Wednesday 15 May 1912

SHARE OUR HERITAGE
0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments